Improve Your Vocabulary, Speed Reading, and Spelling Tutorials

In my earlier article in 2012, I wrote about how the meaning of "marriage" is ever-changing. I foreshadowed one definition of "marriage" as an inherently flexible legal term of art that develops over time; and governments that make laws with respect to “marriage” can prescribe the unions to be regarded as “marriages”. Since then, the High Court of Australia in Cth v ACT [2013] HCA 55 has unaminously declared for all Australia the constitutional meaning of "marriage". It turns out that the meaning of "marriage" I foreshadowed in 2012 is the meaning the High Court has adopted. In the process, the High Court has traced the history of "marriage", has separated the Christian context of "marriage" from the secular context of "marriage", and has clarified the inequality that exists when the status of "marriage" is accorded to some people but not to others.

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Funny mistakes by others, or even your own funny mistakes, can help you to improve your vocabulary — so long as you learn from those mistakes. For example, the new book The Funny Dictionary is a collection of student bloopers, arranged in alphabetical form. Most of the funny definitions in The Funny Dictionary come from answers school children have provided to English exam questions. But in order to find the book's definitions funny, you must understand the child's mistake. For this, you need a good vocabulary. Study the following extract from The Funny Dictionary to see if you can work out the source of the child's confusion and why their definition is funny. It's much better if you can work out the joke for yourself, but we've given you some examples to help anyway. The Funny Dictionary is available in its entirety, for free, at the-funny-dictionary.com.

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A great way of enlivening your writing, whether it's an essay, an email, a poem, a blog post, or a short story, is to use similes.

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